Course Schedule

All of the courses and materials are delivered online. The entire program is distance learning. Courses are eight weeks long.  Students can take 3 course per semester, 2 in the summer. If you have a special circumstance and would like to take more than 3 courses per semester, you must gain approval from either Prof. Kurzer or Dr. Ryckman.

If a student is enrolled over the maximum number of allowed courses without gaining prior permission on the first day of the semester, then they will be administratively dropped from the extra course(s) after 48 hours. An email will be sent to the student informing them that they will be administratively dropped, and will identify from which courses s/he will be dropped.

Courses open one week before the official course start date. All courses are delivered via D2L:  d2l@arizona.edu

Click here to see our schedule archive

Current Schedule

Fall 2017 Session 2 - Start: Monday, October 23, 2017 - End: Sunday, December 17, 2017

Description Instructor Credits
POL 540A - Global Political Economy - Fall 2017
This course considers the ways in which the global economy has become intertwined with domestic politics, especially in developing and non-OECD states.  We will examine global economic forces, including trade, international finance, and migration through the lens of globalization.  In particular, this course explores the ways in which these global factors affect the domestic politics in much of the world, which can have profound public policy and security implications. 
Dr. Paul Bezerra 3
POL 544A - International Relations of Sub-Saharan Africa - Fall 2017

This course is intended to be a survey of the literature addressing international politics in sub-Saharan Africa.  Beginning with pre-colonial contexts and working through to present challenges facing African states and the international community more broadly, we will learn about a variety of topics concerning African politics.

Professor Jessica Maves Braithwaite 3
POL 546A - Politics of Islamism - Fall 2017

Political Islamism has been a focus of policy makers in the post- 9/11 era. However, before concrete strategies can be formulated to deal with this concern, the nature and dynamics of Islamist mobilization itself must be understood. To do that, this course will benefit from the knowledge generated through years of study in different parts of the world and in various disciplines in identifying: What is it? What causes it? What motivates an individual to join an Islamist group and possibly use violence? Under what conditions will these groups moderate, and when will they radicalize? Starting with extremist groups in the Middle East, we will examine the historical evolution and current dynamics of Islamist extremist groups in Central Asia, Caucasus, Southeast Asia, Africa and the West respectively.

Dr. Tolga Turker 3
POL 551 - Soviet and Post-Soviet Foreign Policy - Fall 2017

Surveys Russian power capabilities, foreign policy, and engagement of the world system. Attention to the Soviet period, but focus on the post-1991 era. Relations with the U.S., Germany, and China are highlighted, as are relations with former Soviet Union (FSU) countries.

Professor Pat Willerton 3
POL 556A - Issues in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar - Fall 2017

Countries such as the US, China, and Russia that once were separated by great distances are now connected by cyber at the speed of light.  This change requires us to rethink what we know about security, international relations, and war.  To complicate matters, the Internet has instantiated differently in different States due to bureaucratic, political, cultural, and economic factors and has shaped each State in different ways.  Understanding these cyber-differences is critical for understanding the role of networks in Security for each State and the role of “attribution”, “retaliation”, and “deterrence” in State-relations.

Dr. Volodymyr Lysenko 3
POL 564 - International Relations of East Asia - Fall 2017

This course will examine and analyze a host of current international relations issues in the East Asia region, with an emphasis on United States foreign policy.

Professor Paul Schuler 3
POL 580A - Mexican National Security - Fall 2017
Mexico and the United States have always shared a complex relationship. The current one is full of hope for expanding economic opportunity and plagued by fears driven by internal violence. Mexico is the third largest trading partner with the US with nearly 270 billion in trade in 2014; that amounts to a million dollars crossing the border every minute. Conversely, the fight against organized crime has claimed more than 60,000 lives since 2006 and there are nearly 25,000 people reported as disappeared. 2015 also marked a historic change in international engagement, with President Enrique Pena Nieto announcing a new peace keeping mission for the Mexican armed forces. Understanding the unique Mexican security situation and the Mexican perspective of security policy is critical for academics and policymakers that deal with this complex US-Mexican relationship. The course will include lecturers from the Mexican academic community and Mexican security forces.
Dr. Matias Bianchi 3
POL 695A - Professional Colloquium - Fall 2017

Capstone project, in which students develop a portfolio that overviews their academic work in the context of their professional goals. This should be taken as the final course of the MA degree. 

Dr. Kirssa Ryckman 3

Upcoming Schedule

Spring 2018 Session 1 - Start: Monday, January 8, 2018 - End: Sunday, March 4, 2018

Description Instructor Credits
POL 519 - Terrorism and Counterterrorism - Spring 2018

This course addresses how the formation of the state has been affected by war and will be increasingly affected by more modern security concerns such as terrorism.  Graduate-level requirements include reading three additional documents and critically reviewing them as instructed.

Dr. Kirssa Ryckman 3
POL 520A - How Terrorism Ends - Spring 2018

This course is intended to be a survey of the political science literature’s understandings about how terrorist campaigns come to a close.  Prior to tackling questions of the end of terrorism head-on, we will first survey the literatures on definitions and theories of terrorism. Our survey of the various fates of terrorist groups and campaigns will explore; how governments use force to try to end terrorism, occasions when governments and terrorist participate in negotiations to find a solution to their incompatibility, outcomes in which groups achieve victory or are defeated, and scenarios in which groups opt to reorient away from violence into other legal and illegal activities. 

Professor Alex Braithwaite 3
POL 546A - Politics of Islamism - Spring 2018

Political Islamism has been a focus of policy makers in the post- 9/11 era. However, before concrete strategies can be formulated to deal with this concern, the nature and dynamics of Islamist mobilization itself must be understood. To do that, this course will benefit from the knowledge generated through years of study in different parts of the world and in various disciplines in identifying: What is it? What causes it? What motivates an individual to join an Islamist group and possibly use violence? Under what conditions will these groups moderate, and when will they radicalize? Starting with extremist groups in the Middle East, we will examine the historical evolution and current dynamics of Islamist extremist groups in Central Asia, Caucasus, Southeast Asia, Africa and the West respectively.

Dr. Tolga Turker 3
POL 550A - Research Design in the Social Sciences - Spring 2018

The aim of this course is to establish the necessary skills for the evaluation and execution of social science research. The scientific method provides a framework for building knowledge, but the application of the scientific method to the study of social phenomena poses several serious challenges.  In this course, we will introduce the fundamentals of sound social scientific research design.

Professor Chad Westerland 3
POL 556A - Issues in Cybersecurity and Cyberwar - Spring 2018

Countries such as the US, China, and Russia that once were separated by great distances are now connected by cyber at the speed of light.  This change requires us to rethink what we know about security, international relations, and war.  To complicate matters, the Internet has instantiated differently in different States due to bureaucratic, political, cultural, and economic factors and has shaped each State in different ways.  Understanding these cyber-differences is critical for understanding the role of networks in Security for each State and the role of “attribution”, “retaliation”, and “deterrence” in State-relations.

Dr. Volodymyr Lysenko 3
POL 557A - The Politics of Cybersecurity - Spring 2018

This course provides an introduction to the politics of cybersecurity in the U.S. as well as the European Union (EU). Starting with a discussion of key concepts of cybersecurity, the class continues to analyze how U.S. and EU cybersecurity policy making differ. Recently, both the U.S. and EU passed new cybersecurity legislation laying different emphasis on privacy protection, crime prevention and the involvement of tech businesses in the policy process through public private partnerships. Why are the U.S. and Europe applying different approaches to cybersecurity policy? The goal of the course is to answer this question by comparing the institutions, actors and process of cybersecurity policy making in the U.S. and the EU. While both follow different approaches to cybersecurity policy as such, they agree on the need of enhanced international cooperation on the issue. The course ends with a unit on the current state of cybersecurity cooperation across the Atlantic and the implications of the politics of cybersecurity on the future of transatlantic relationship.

Dr. Eva-Maria Maggi 3
POL 581A - Domestic Politics and American Foreign Policy - Spring 2018
Domestic politics and foreign policy were once considered to be separate entities, such as in the old fashioned statement that governments could afford either “guns or butter.” A more contemporary account notes the various ways that domestic politics and foreign policy are intertwined. Domestic politics shapes the foreign policy decisions of a country, and foreign policy often impinges on domestic politics. Topics covered in this class will include the role of the president, Congress, the bureaucracy and the courts in determining foreign policy. Conflicts and cooperation between these government entities will be highlighted. How public opinion and interest groups influence foreign policy also will be covered. Finally, the effects of foreign policy decisions on domestic politics will be considered.
Professor Barbara Norrander 3

Spring 2018 Session 2 - Start: Monday, March 5, 2018 - End: Sunday, April 29, 2018

Description Instructor Credits
POL 530A - Dynamics of Civil Wars - Spring 2018
This course is intended to be a survey of the general dynamics of civil wars, with a complementary focus on this form of unrest as it plays out in African countries. Modules address various aspects of civil wars (e.g. onset, duration, termination, recurrence, ethnicity, natural resources), and then examines those aspects in the context of a conflict in sub-Saharan Africa. Students will have an opportunity to explore in-depth a conflict of their choosing, applying the general theories covered in class to their specific civil war of choice.
Professor Jessica Maves Braithwaite 3
POL 540A - Global Political Economy - Spring 2018
This course considers the ways in which the global economy has become intertwined with domestic politics, especially in developing and non-OECD states.  We will examine global economic forces, including trade, international finance, and migration through the lens of globalization.  In particular, this course explores the ways in which these global factors affect the domestic politics in much of the world, which can have profound public policy and security implications. 
Dr. Paul Bezerra 3
POL 558A - Politics in the Digital Age - Spring 2018

The digital revolution is changing politics. From Barack Obama's use of the Internet to drive his presidential campaign, to the upheaval of the Arab Spring and the emergence of new social movements like #OccupyWallStreet, digital technology is challenging and changing established institutions on a number of fronts. This course introduces students to the history of the Internet and the emerging technologies that are defining the Digital Age. It places emphasis on the role of technology in politics and its implications for democracy and citizen rights. The course will cover a wide range of issues related to governance of the internet, privacy and security, the role of the media and open source development.

Dr. Matias Bianchi 3
POL 567A - Emerging Powers in the Global System - Spring 2018

This course offers analytical tools to investigate the nature of modern international system, to explain the logic of emerging multipolar world, to analyze the role of rising Great Powers and Regional Powers in the modern geopolitical architecture. The central focus of the course will be on Russia, China, Iran, and Turkey, and on their foreign policy strategies in a global and regional context. Special attention will be paid to various versions of the New Silk Road and to other modern geopolitical initiatives.

Dr. Mikhail Beznosov 3
POL 599 - Mexican Security Workshop - Spring 2018

POL 599 is a special topics course on Mexican national security. This course combines students from the ISS program with students from Mexico who work in law enforcement and national security. The course includes a series of guest lectures from experts on Mexican national security, which are combined with readings, discussions, and a research paper as the final course project. This course is co-taught by faculty from the UA and ITAM, the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México.

3
POL 695A - Professional Colloquium - Spring 2018

Capstone project, in which students develop a portfolio that overviews their academic work in the context of their professional goals. This should be taken as the final course of the MA degree. 

Dr. Kirssa Ryckman 3